Think about your old manual Spectronic 20, or your immediate perusing spectrophotometer that you use in your lab. You line up your examples in succession. Before them, you place some little example cups or possibly a progression of cuvettes, and you pipette a known measure of test into each cup. You at that point add a reagent and some way or another blend the reagent and test. You do this for each example. You may have more reagents to add so you rehash the entire cycle until all reagents are added. At that point you start a clock. At the point when the clock blares you realize you suffer a heart attack time window to peruse the absorbance (or grouping) of your examples. You read by physically moving the shading created test to a spectrometer cuvette, by utilizing a peristaltic siphon to move the example to a stream cell effectively in the spectrometer, or by embeddings the cylinder or cuvette that you used to build up the example tone in. At that point, you press a catch to send the perusing to a printer, a PC program, or you physically record the perusing onto a research center worksheet.

Did you shake and blend each example the very same way without fail? Will you blend them a similar way consistently? Will each examiner run them the very same way you have?

Is there shading or turbidity in the examples? Would it be advisable for you to zero your instrument with each example, or just with reagent water spaces?

Is the specific time you perused the last absorbance basic?

The cycle portrayed is the thing that you are robotizing by utilizing a discrete analyzer. Rather than arranging tests, you are emptying aliquots into test cups that are set on an auto sampler plate. Rather than moving a known measure of test to a cuvette, the discrete analyzer does. Rather than adding reagents and blending, the discrete analyzer does. Rather than beginning a clock, the discrete analyzer does. Rather than perusing the absorbance, recording the perusing, and ascertaining an outcome the discrete analyzer does.

The gas chromatography analyzer has mechanized practically every one of the straightforward colorimetric strategies for you. Test volume is estimated and administered the very same way, without fail. Reagents are added and blended the very same way without fail. The clock is set and absorbance is estimated the very same way without fail. Results are determined the very same way without fail.

The discrete analyzer pipettes, weakens, adds reagents, blends, aligns, gauges, computes, and reports just for you. You select a technique by console. There is no equipment to physically change, no cartridge to wash out, no baselines to screen, no frequency channels to change. Test and reagent volumes are controlled by a choice in a PC program, not by the inward width of a peristaltic siphon tube.